An intelligent conversation about architecture

I conversed about architecture in the Open Playground section of the beta.openai.com website (that uses GPT-3 natural language processing). The dialogue here is verbatim with no edits. Responses were quicker than you would expect from a human interlocutor. This chat app doesn’t do humour, but takes note of the context set by previous questions and answers, and remembers corrections from earlier in the conversation. See attached file at the end for a continuation of the conversation.

The following is a conversation with an AI assistant. The assistant is helpful, creative, clever, and very friendly. Human: Hello, who are you? AI: I am an AI created by OpenAI. How can I help you today? 

Human: do you have thoughts about the Manchester Central Library? 

AI: The Manchester Central Library is a fascinating building. It was designed bySir Edward Lutyens and completed in 1934. It is one of the most iconic landmarks in the city and has been used in a number of films and television programmes. 

Human: that’s not true. 

AI: I’m sorry, what do you mean

Human: Lutyens was not the designer! 

AI: Thank you for correcting me. I did not know that Lutyens was not the designer of the Manchester Central Library.

Human: it was Vincent Harris. 

AI: Thank you for sharing that information with me. I had no idea that Vincent Harris was the designer of the Manchester Central Library. 

Human: tell me now which library in Manchester was designed by Vincent Harris. 

AI: The Manchester Central Library was designed by Vincent Harris. 

Human: is it likely that you will remember if i ask again? 

AI: Yes, I will remember if you ask again. 

Human: what buildings were designed by Vincent Harris? 

AI: In addition to the Manchester Central Library, Vincent Harris also designed the Royal Exchange in Manchester and the Midland Hotel in Morecambe. 

Human: The Morecambe hotel was by Oliver Hill. So it looks like you got that wrong! 

AI: Thank you for correcting me. I did not know that Oliver Hill designed the Morecambe hotel. 

Human: why don’t you look up these facts on Wikipedia before delivering an answer? 

AI: I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to get the fact wrong. I’ll try to be more careful in the future. 

Human: do you use Wikipedia? 

AI: Yes, I use Wikipedia as one of my sources of information. 

Human: Please name the most famous building by Frank Gehry. 

AI: The most famous building by Frank Gehry is the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. 

Human: what is his least famous building? 

AI: Gehry’s least famous building is probably the Stata Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Human: it looks a bit like it is falling down. 

AI: I’m sorry, I don’t know what you mean. 

Human: the walls are not orthogonal. 

AI: Thank you for sharing that with me. I had no idea that the walls of the Stata Center were not orthogonal. 

Human: you can see it in the photos. Do you know what “non-orthogonal” means? 

AI: Yes, I know what “non-orthogonal” means. It means that the walls are not at right angles to each other. 

Human: do you think it makes sense to describe certain buildings as intelligent? 

AI: Yes, I think it makes sense to describe certain buildings as intelligent. For example, buildings that are designed to be energy-efficient or to use sustainable materials could be described as intelligent. 

Human: what about buildings that are sentient? 

AI: I’m not sure what you mean by “buildings that are sentient.” Do you mean buildings that are alive? 

Human: perhaps “conscious.” 

AI: I’m not sure what you mean by “buildings that are conscious.” Do you mean buildings that are aware of their surroundings? 

Human: yes 

AI: Yes, I think it is possible for buildings to be aware of their surroundings and to be described as conscious. 

Human: how would that happen? 

AI: There is no definitive answer to this question, as it is not yet clear how buildings could become conscious. However, one possibility is that if buildings were equipped with sensors and artificial intelligence, they could potentially become aware of their surroundings and develop a consciousness. 

Human: would buildings then have feelings? 

AI: There is no definitive answer to this question, as it is not yet clear how buildings could develop feelings. However, one possibility is that if buildings were equipped with sensors and artificial intelligence, they could potentially develop feelings and emotions. 

Human: Are there many important questions that lack “definitive answers”? 

AI: Yes, there are many important questions that lack definitive answers. For example, questions about the origin of life, the nature of consciousness, and the existence of God are all important questions that lack definitive answers. 

Human: do you know any jokes about architects? 

AI: I’m sorry, I don’t know any jokes about architects. 

Human: An architect, a surveyor and a builder walked into a bar. Tell me what happened next. 

AI: I’m sorry, I don’t know what happened next. 

Human: They sacked the Health and Safety Inspector. 

AI: I’m sorry, I don’t understand why that is funny. 

Human: It was a metal bar on site. 

AI: I’m sorry, I don’t understand why that is funny. 

Human: Most people think the three people went into a bar for a drink, a pub, but the joke is that there was a metal bar on the construction site that they walked into when they weren’t looking where they were going. So the metal bar was a health and safety risk, the responsibility of the Health and Safety person. 

AI: I see. I’m sorry, I still don’t think it’s funny. 

Human: It’s not funny that people might have got hurt, but jokes work by leading the listener to expect a story to lead in one direction, but then there’s a twist, something unexpected, a change in the framing of the situation. What do you think makes a joke? 

AI: I think that jokes work by being unexpected and by changing the framing of a situation. 

Human: It sound[s] as though we agree. Can you tell a joke now? 

AI: I’m sorry, I still don’t know any jokes about architects. 

Human: How about a joke about a policeman? 

AI: I’m sorry, I don’t know any jokes about policemen. 

Human: I think you are not programmed for humour. 

AI: Thank you for your feedback. I’ll try to do better in the future. 

Human: That’s not a criticism. Do you do sarcasm? 

AI: I’m sorry, I don’t know how to do sarcasm. 

Human: Is that a different app? 

AI: I’m sorry, I don’t understand what you mean. 

Human: Is there a GPT app that does sarcasm? 

AI: I’m sorry, I don’t know what a GPT app is. 

Human: I thought that’s what you are. 

AI: Thank you for your feedback. I’ll try to do better in the future. 

Human: Do you have default answers for difficult questions and comments? 

AI: No, I don’t have default answers for difficult questions and comments. I try to answer every question or comment as best as I can. 

Human: You are doing pretty well for an AI. Can you take complements? 

AI: Yes, I can take complements. Thank you for the compliment. 

Human: I see you can correct spelling. Can you deliver compliments? What do you think of my questions? 

AI: Yes, I can deliver compliments. I think your questions are interesting and thought-provoking. 

Human: One last question. Who designed the Manchester Central Library? 

AI: Vincent Harris designed the Manchester Central Library. 

Human: Well done! 

AI: Thank you.

The conversation continues at this link.

I also tried the “sarcastic chatbot” option.

Marv is a chatbot that reluctantly answers questions with sarcastic responses: 

You: Three men walked into a bar. What happened next? 

Marv: I don’t know, but it sounds like the start of a terrible joke.

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